Motor Vehicle Incident Preventability Example

 

Motor Vehicle Incident Preventability Example

The heart of motor vehicle collision or incident analysis is the determination of preventability, based on the facts of the incident. These facts can come from a variety of sources; the incident analysis, statements and information from the driver(s) involved, and from your own incident analysis, and reconstruction. These sources of information must be understood, analyzed and evaluated in light of all available facts that are pertinent to the causal factors of the incident.

Each incident must be evaluated individually to determine if it is preventable or non-preventable. Certain incidents will generally fall in the non-preventable category, and certain others, in the absence of extenuating circumstances and conditions, fall in the preventable category. The descriptions of incidents listed below do not cover every incident that may occur, but they are intended to provide general guidance to assist in determining preventability.

PREVENTABLE INCIDENTS

INCIDENT NON-PREVENTABLE IF:
STRUCK IN REAR BY OTHER VEHICLE
  • Driver's vehicle was legally and properly parked
  • Driver was proceeding in his/her own lane of traffic at a safe and lawful speed (i.e. basic speed law - no faster than safe for conditions)
  • Driver was stopped in traffic due to existing conditions or was stopped in compliance with traffic sign or signal or the directions of a police officer or other person legitimately controlling traffic.
  • Driver was in proper lane waiting to make turn
STRUCK WHILE PARKED
  • Driver was properly parked in a location where parking was permitted
  • Vehicle was stopped, parked, or left standing in accordance with state Vehicle Code and company's Code of Safe Practices
ROAD DEBRIS Road debris is kicked up by another vehicle, damaging the company’s vehicle or any other vehicle driven on company business (i.e., rock cracks windshield).
NOTE: Incidents where a company’s vehicle kicks up a rock and strikes another vehicle are reported as a third party incident.
VANDALISM AND/OR THEFT Damage to vehicle as a result of vandalism and/or theft
ACT OF GOD/NATURE Damage to a vehicle as a result of an Act of God/Nature (i.e., tree falls on vehicle, flood damage, etc)
CONTACT WITH ANIMAL/WILDLIFE            Damage to a vehicle as a result of contact with an animal / wildlife while following all rules of the road

 

 PREVENTABLE INCIDENTS

INCIDENT PREVENTABLE IF:
INCIDENTS AT INTERSECTIONS    
  • Driver failed to control speed so that he/she could stop within available sight distance
  • Driver failed to check cross-traffic and wait for it to clear before entering intersection
  • Driver pulled out from side street in the face of oncoming traffic
  • Driver collided with person, vehicle, or object while making right or left turn
  • Driver collided with vehicle making left or right turn in front of him/her
STRIKING OTHER VEHICLE IN REAR
  • Driver failed to maintain safe following distance and have his/her vehicle under control
  • Driver failed to keep track of traffic conditions and did not slow down
  • Driver failed to ascertain whether vehicle ahead was moving slowly, stopped, or slowing down for any reason
  • Driver misjudged rate of overtaking
  • Driver came too close before pulling out to pass
  • Driver failed to wait for vehicle ahead to move before proceeding forward
  • Driver failed to leave sufficient room for passing vehicle to get safely back in line
  • Driver going too fast for road conditions
SIDESWIPE AND HEAD-ON COLLISON
  • Driver was not entirely in his/her proper lane of travel (i.e. this includes multiple turn lanes)
  • Driver did not pull to right and slow down or stop for vehicle encroaching on his/her lane of travel when such action could have been taken without additional danger
STRUCK IN REAR BY OTHER VEHICLE
  • Driver was passing slower traffic near an intersection and had to make a sudden stop
  • Driver made a sudden stop to park, load, or unload
SQUEEZE PLAYS AND SHUTOUTS 
  • Driver failed to yield right-of-way when necessary to avoid incident
BACKING INCIDENTS     
  • Driver backed up when backing could have been avoided by better planning of his/her route
  • Driver backed into traffic stream when such backing could have been avoided
  • Driver failed to get out of cab and check proposed path of backward travel (i.e. 360 walkaround)
  • Driver depended solely on mirrors when it was practical to look back
  • Driver failed to get out of cab periodically and recheck conditions when backing a long distance
  • Driver failed to check behind vehicle parked at curb before attempting to leave parking space
  • Driver relied solely on a guide to help him/her back
  • Driver backed from blind side when he/she could have made a sight-side approach
INCIDENTS INVOLVING RAIL OPERATED VEHICLES
  • Driver attempted to cross tracks directly ahead of train or streetcar
  • Driver ran into side of train or streetcar
  • Driver stopped or parked on or too close to tracks
INCIDENTS WHILE PASSING
  • Driver passed where view of road ahead was obstructed by hill, curve, vegetation, traffic, adverse weather conditions, etc
  • Driver attempted to pass in the face of closely approaching traffic
  • Driver passed on double yellow line
  • Driver failed to signal change of lanes
  • Driver pulled out of in front of other traffic overtaking from rear
  • Driver cut in too short while returning to right lane
  • Driver traveling too fast for road conditions
INCIDENTS WHILE BEING PASSED
  • Driver failed to stay in his own lane and hold speed or reduce it to permit safe passing
INCIDENTS WHILE MERGING INTO TRAFFIC
  • Driver failed to signal when pulling out from curb
  • Driver failed to check traffic before pulling out from curb
  • Driver failed to look back to check traffic if he/she was in position where mirrors did not show traffic conditions
  • Driver attempted to pull out in a manner that forced other vehicle(s) to change speed or direction
  • Driver failed to make full and complete stop being entering from side street, alley, or driverway
  • Driver failed to make full and complete stop before crossing sidewalk
  • Driver failed to yield right of way to approaching traffic
PEDESTRIAN INCIDENTS
  • Driver did not reduce speed in area of heavy pedestrian traffic
  • Driver was not prepared to stop
  • Driver failed to yield right of way to pedestrian
MECHANICAL DEFECT INCIDENTS
  • Defect was caused by driver’s abusive handling of the vehicle
  • Defect was known to driver but ignored
ALL TYPES OF INCIDENTS
  • Driver was not operating at a speed suitable for the existing conditions of the road, weather, and traffic
  • Driver failed to control speed so that he/she could stop within assured clear distance
  • Driver misjudged available clearance
  • Driver failed to yield right-of-way to avoid incident
  • Driver failed to accurately observe existing rules or special instructions, the regulations of any federal or state regulatory agency, or any applicable traffic laws or ordinances
  • Driver failed to secure load (e.g. debris, equipment, material) on company vehicle and hit 3rd party vehicle

 

Download the Motor Vehicle Incident Preventability Guideline