Automatic Tire Chains

 

Automatic Tire Chains

Just wondering if anyone out there has some hands on experience with automatic tire chains?

I have been looking at a company called Onspot that manufactures this type of tire chain and would like to know if anyone has had good success with this equipment.

Anonymous (not verified)
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We are currently looking at these also. Our plan is to put them on one vehicle as a pilot to see how well they work. I haven't heard to many positive things about them, so I want to see for myself before I formulate an opinion. I'll let you know how they work out after we've had them on for awhile.

Anonymous (not verified)
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We have a set on our dump truck, which our crews use for road sanding in the winter. They did not perform well, and are now idle. We switched back to z-chains. As far as I know, the only group to really embrace automatic chains has been school bus fleets. Not really sure why they work in that application but not others.......

Anonymous (not verified)
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We have auto chains on our GM medium duty radio interoperability truck. They have failed to perform as desired. They would regularly deploy on their own. We always had chains dragging. We have tied the chains up and advised drivers to not use them. I have heard stories from other dissatisfied customers as well.

Anonymous (not verified)
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What were the problems you experienced with the automatic tire chains?

Anonymous (not verified)
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Well, we installed the auto chains on one of our Class 7 Generation trucks. I spoke to the GF in Generation and he told me the guys have used them twice so far and they've worked without a problem. This truck is mainly used on the road and traveling from our different dams and substations. I told the GF to continue to update me with both positive and negative feedback, so the next time I hear something I'll update the group again with our experience.

Anonymous (not verified)
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It has been several years since we used them, but as I recall they were not fully deploying. They are still installed on the truck, we just never turn them on.

Anonymous (not verified)
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Our department uses Onspots on all fire apparatus. They work well up to six inches of snow. After that, we convert to Z-chains. If you have dual wheels (19.5 or larger), the onspot chain reaches only the inside dual. We have used both onspot and Z-chains, which resulted in effective manueverability in deeper snow.

Anonymous (not verified)
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We also have been looking in to Automatic Chains. I have done some research on "Insta-Chain", A little pricey, but have some good features.

Anonymous (not verified)
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He is correct; they're OK up to 6" of snow and only catch the inside dual. Having driven them, I found that the chain disc tends to "plow" in deeper snow, building up a wall of snow in front of the disc their effectiveness is reduced.

Anonymous (not verified)
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We have used automatic tire chains with little success. They work fine in light snow and wet ground but once you get into deeper snow and any type of mud, our experience hasn't been too positive. Most operators don't utilize them after the first time or two except in very moderate conditions. We have also experienced damaged tires from a combination of the tire chains and the operators application of the tool. From my view, they're not worth the investment.

Anonymous (not verified)
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We have outfitted one of our fleets with automatic tire chains. I believe they are OnSpot. The primary reason for us to go with automatic tire chains is because snow events in the Pacific North West are spotty west of the mountains, and we seldom ever get over 4" of snow. Our neighboring transit agency also has quite a few of their buses equipped with the automatic tire chains. The big time saver for us is due to the fickle weather here, we don't have to spend vast amounts of labor having to chain-up, and then chain-down an entire fleet, only to have to chain them back up again. We were advised by the vendor that these chains were no longer effective once the snow gets over 4" of thickness. Currently, if we know a snow event is going to last several days in a row and there would be significant accumulation, we would chain-up our buses with the Z-chain product.