Vehicle Blind Spots

 

Vehicle Blind Spots

Hi all,

We are trying to eliminate blind spots for our drivers on all of our vehicles.  Currently we are piloting all sorts of mirrors, cameras, and sonar.  

Could some of you share what has been the most successful approach not only from a safety perspective but financial as well.

Thanks,

Fleet Manager, Vectren Corporation

Anonymous (not verified)
Anonymous's picture

I'm responding on behalf of a fleet driver trainer, NHayward, who wrote:

"I under your problem. However, a blind spot is simply that - i.e. an area where you cannot see. I insist on any fleet course that I deliver that each driver checks over both shoulders and check again. Cameras, etc, are fine and go a long way to help BUT nothing beats the shoulder check."

Anonymous (not verified)
Anonymous's picture

I'm responding on behalf of EStuttaford, who wrote:

"I agree that the blind spot - the over-the-shoulder check is a great way to identify anyone lurking there... less recognized is the blind spot on the front corner-passenger-side below and ahead of the front wheel and rear view mirror.

We had success in addressing this problem by mounting a downward facing mirror on the corner of the cab, visible to the driver through the windscreen, not through the passenger door window. We used a standard mirror fitted to a custom made bracket.

We also addressed the passenger side blind spot next to and towards the rear of the cab by sticking a convex mirror of about 4-inches in diameter into the inside of the windscreen and about a quarter of the distance from the passenger side. The convex profile of the mirror opens up an additional field of vision next to the passenger side of the cab.

Lastly, we trained the drivers to recognize areas risk areas around the vehicle at different times and how they can change in different traffic situations as well as to focus attention on the high risk areas - i.e. when approaching a freeway off-ramp, watch your driver side mirror for drivers taking a chance to cross in front of you to get to the off-ramp. Focus on the passenger side mirror and blind spot when passing on ramps, etc."

Anonymous (not verified)
Anonymous's picture

I'm responding on behalf of project manager, Lpalombi, who wrote:

"While it may seem simple, many drivers skip adjusting the mirrors when they get in a vehicle. If your light-duty vehicles are shared by different drivers, this is especially important. Your drivers may be doing this already and this is what I would consider to be the low-cost first step. I follow these instructions:

http://www.cartalk.com/content/avoiding-blind-spot-6

Perhaps you can post reminders in your fleet vehicles."

Anonymous (not verified)
Anonymous's picture

We are adding Blind Spot Cameras along with the Blind spot mirrors we already have, as this seemed to get a positive response from users along with Leadership of our groups at greatest risk. Again though keep in mind that the drivers hold the brunt of responsibility because, clearly they are the responsible ones to insure all mirrors are clean and adjusted properly for them .

Anonymous (not verified)
Anonymous's picture

I'm responding on behalf of CSA. You may click on this link to view his response in the vendor forum - http://fleetanswers.com/forum/vendors-forum/vehicle-blind-spots-post

Anonymous (not verified)
Anonymous's picture

I'm responding on behalf of kmartin, who wrote:

"Front and wide angle mirrors will go a long way to mitigate against blind spot problems. While cameras will help if you are operating in congested areas, blind spot training is the way forward. Recognize the blind spots on the vehicle and inform the driver of their locations. Before mounting a vehicle, the driver should take a walk around the vehicle to check to see if there are any hazards present. On the road, keep checking the mirrors to spot the hazard before it becomes a problem."